Great news!  Now you can write Dr. Baum and ask questions.  He is a wonderful vet and knows a whole lot about pets of all kinds.  Of course he won't be able to answer all questions, but please do submit yours through the contact at the bottom of this screen, and he'll answer all he can.  To start off, we published an article Dr. Baum wrote about very basic but important issues to consider in doggie grooming.  You can read it below, and see new questions by clicking below:  Please note: If you feel the condition of your pet is critical, Dr. Baum suggests you contact your local vet ASAP!

Thank you for contacting us for Dr. B

Pawpress Books
The Pawprints Tail
Writers' Tools
Writers Blog
Ina's Weird Prompts
Publishing Services
Speaking Services
News Flash!
Grownups' Corner
Grownups' Stories
Kids' Corner
Kids' Stories
Pawprints Literacy+
Educators' Corner
Pets' Corner
Ask Our Vet
Pawprints Pet Photos
Pet Eulogies
Story Time w/ Dr. B
Pawprints Gifts
Press Room/Reviews
Pawprints Hits
About Ina


We are very pleased to introduce you to Dr. Barry Baum, the wonderful veterinarian who was responsible for saving the life of my cat, Tamba.  Cheers also to his exceptional staff at Center Sinai Veterinary Hospital, in Los Angeles, especially Dr. Tom, who co-cared for Tamba, and all the remarkable, attentive front office and vet techs who allowed and even encouraged things like night visits when the little kid had to stay over.   I'll never forget how frightened Tamba was at first.  But after the techs brought me a chair, I took her onto my lap, IV's and all, and stayed for an hour.  Then, I put her back into her holding area, where she took a bath, and curled up for a nap, contented, knowing she was not abandoned.  Today, almost a year later, she is one frisky kid, at the ripe old age of 11. 

We're starting with an article from Dr. Baum.  In future, he will be responding to your questions. You'll find a spot below to send in yours -- anything to do with pets, from pussycats, to birds, to dogs, rats, snakes, gerbils.  Maybe not a camel or a crocodile.  He'll answer a question each week.  And for a special treat, be on the lookout for some of Dr. Baum's stories on our site.  They're priceless.
Click here to welcome Dr. B!

Read a Dr. B story

Read about Dr. B

 
       
    photo cutefunnyanimals.com

In twenty-seven years of veterinary practice, I have dispensed a lot of advice.  Yet, I find myself returning time and again to a message that is so simple and basic, that to ignore repeating it would be the biggest disservice to my patients as well as my clients.

Two of the essential principles of pet ownership are to always apply common sense to any situation and to observe for cause and effect relationships.  By utilizing this advice your stress level will be lower, your pet will be healthier and happier and your veterinary bills will be dramatically less.

For example, let us examine the issue of how often to bathe your dog.  Very often I see clients who have been told by well meaning advisors that to subject their pet to any more than one or two baths a year would be harmful to the well being of the dogs skin and coat.  When asked if they thought that the advice was correct most would reply that they had wondered about it but yet ignored their gut feelings and lived with their unwashed and odiferous companions.

In order to gently point out the error of their ways, I would ask about their own shampooing patterns.  Most people would admit to washing their own hair several times a week.  Why did they feel that to wash their dog even once per week would have a dire consequence??

Forty years ago the shampoos that were available for pets were essentially detergents that stripped the skin of dirt (which was good) as well as all the oils that were important for a healthy coat.  Hence, the myth began that to bath a dog would lead to a dry coat.  Over the years, the formulations of the shampoos changed and conditioning agents were added to the detergents thus allowing the skin to be cleaned without damaging the precious oils.

I tell my clients that ninety percent of the dogs could be bathed every day with ninety percent of the shampoos on the market without any problems, although I routinely recommend bathing every one to two weeks.  But, here is where the cause and effect principle comes into play.

Bathing may not cure a skin problem but it should never make it worse.  However, there may be times where a particular shampoo may cause a reaction particular to that individual.  If you are observant enough to notice redness, flakiness or increased itching after a bath, don't condemn the institution of bathing, just use a different shampoo.

Specific skin conditions often require specialized medicated shampoo.  Consult with your local veterinarian for the professional advice, which will benefit your pet.

NEXT WEEKFlaking skin: what does it mean?

Do you have a question for our Virtuoso Vet?  Submit it here!  Dr. Baum will answer as many of your questions as possible!

Name *
Email *
Please type your email twice.
Confirm *
Subject *
Please tell us what type of pet you are asking about.
Telephone *
Required in case email does not get to you.
Your Question for Dr. B *
City *
State *
Country *
May we post your question and Dr. Baum's answer? *
 Yes 
 No 
Please see our privacy policy below.
Image Verification
captcha
Please enter the text from the image:
[Refresh Image] [What's This?]

If you are lucky enough to live in Los Angeles when you need a really good vet, you can call
to set up an appointment with Dr. Baum or another of the highly skilled staff at
Center-Sinai Veterinary Hospital.  The number is 310-559-3770.

Check out the new site www.CenterSinaiAnimalHospital.com! Your questions and answers appear there, with a
link from our site, and more pet care information and special features! Just close the window after visiting, or hit your browser's back button to return to InasPawprints.
 

Pawprints Gifts | Pawprints Reviews | Grownups' Pawprints | Write a Review! | Your Story Here! | Pet Eulogies | Links | Contact Us
Photos (except as noted) and Website Ina Hillebrandt. All rights reserved.